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Posts tagged as “John Allison”

Briefs

He didn’t participate Wichita Eagle Opinion Line, November 24, 2017: “The kindest word that can be ascribed to State Senator Susan Wagle, when she criticizes…

Wichita has school choice, they say

Wichita school superintendent John Allison told Wichitans something they probably didn't know: Parents of Wichita schoolchildren benefit from the district's school choice program.

Citizens generally misinformed on Kansas school spending

When asked about the level of spending on public schools in Kansas, citizens are generally uninformed or misinformed. They also incorrectly thought that spending has declined in recent years.

Wichita school spending

A statement by Wichita school superintendent John Allison is part of an ongoing campaign of misinformation spread by school spending advocates in Wichita and across Kansas.

Kansas and Wichita quick takes: Monday May 23, 2011

Today: Wichita City council; Sedgwick County Commission; Kobach on voter reform in Wall Street Journal; Tiahrt, former Congressman, to address Pachyderms; Wichita speaker lineup set; Blue Ribbon Commission coming to Wichita; School choice cast as civil rights issue; Medicare reform necessary; Science, public agencies, and politics.

Wichita school chief makes plea to Wichita-area legislators

This afternoon, Wichita school superintendent John Allison appeared before the South-central Kansas legislative delegation, explaining Kansas school finance as it applies to the Wichita school district, and offering justification for deciding to join the lawsuit demanding the state spend more on schools.

Referring to base state aid per pupil, which has been cut several times in the past year for a total of 9.5 percent (depending on who's doing the arithmetic), Allison said that base aid is the funding with which the district funds regular education, and the funds with which the district has the greatest latitude. Other funds are restricted, and have fewer options.

Kansas open records examined

Government transparency in Kansas is determined largely by open records and open meetings laws which state lofty goals but offer many loopholes and exemptions and few penalties for violations of the laws.

The Kansas Open Records Act (KORA) starts off well. "It is declared to be the public policy of the state that public records shall be open for inspection by any person unless otherwise provided by this act, and this act shall be liberally construed and applied to promote such policy."

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