Current chemical security regulations should be reauthorized

Currently two committees in the United States House of Representatives are considering legislation that would harm a vital American industry.

This industry is already regulated, and the regulations have accomplished their goal. As explained by the Texas Chemical Council:

The current chemical security regulations are enforced by the Department of Homeland Security, which has clear authority to inspect facilities and apply strong penalties for non-compliance. Since the regulations have been in place, not one incident as a result of terrorism has occurred. These regulations have been effective. Removing the sunset date and making the chemical security regulations permanent would provide the certainty needed to both protect citizens and support our nation’s economic recovery.

The bill, H.R. 2868, is known as Chemical facility anti-terrorism standards. More information from the Texas Chemical Council is below.

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Current chemical security regulations should be reauthorized By Hector Rivero, President & CEO, Texas Chemical Council Americans should take note of the Chemical Facility Anti-terrorism Act being debated in Congress. At a time when millions have already lost their jobs, the Chemical Facility Anti-terrorism Act (HR 2868) would force more people out of work by imposing needless and harmful regulations on American industry. It would also raise prices for many everyday products, including food, water, pharmaceutical drugs, fertilizers and energy. Securing chemical facilities against deliberate attack is crucial to protecting Americans. The fact is that since 2006, clear and comprehensive chemical security regulations have been in place. Those regulations secure everything from chemical facilities to warehouses and university labs. The rules require facilities to address a wide range of threats, from preventing a bomb-laden car from reaching a target to preventing theft or diversion of materials from a site. The current chemical security regulations are enforced by the Department of Homeland Security, which has clear authority to inspect facilities and apply strong penalties for noncompliance. Since the regulations have been in place, not one incident as a result of terrorism has occurred. These regulations have been effective. Removing the sunset date and making the chemical security regulations permanent would provide the certainty needed to both protect citizens and support our nation’s economic recovery. Proposed legislation poses threats Legislation being proposed by Congress should concern us all. It would create overlapping and conflicting security requirements that will cause disruptions of federal security standards, increase government red tape, and create more economic instability. The proposed regulations also go beyond security protections by placing mandates on American manufacturers as to which products and process they use. These mandates will be imposed without any regard for practicality, availability or cost. If current provisions of the proposed bill are implemented, unemployment will shoot even higher and consumers may see prices for everyday consumer products skyrocket. The chemical industry understands the importance of operating safe and secure manufacturing facilities. However, this can be accomplished without compromising our economic security.

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