Tag Archives: Kansas state government

Articles about Kansas, its government, and public policy in Kansas.

Kansas jobs, June 2019

Employment and the labor force in Kansas fell slightly in June 2019, and continued a trend of mostly slower growth than the nation over the year.

Data released today from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, part of the United States Department of Labor, shows falling employment in Kansas for June 2019. (Click charts and tables for larger versions.)

Using seasonally adjusted data, from May 2019 to June 2019, nonfarm employment in Kansas fell by 900, which is 0.1 percent. Over the year, the number of Kansas nonfarm jobs for June 2019 rose by 11,000 or 0.8 percent over last June. This is using seasonally adjusted data. The non-adjusted figure is higher at 16,900, or 1.2 percent.

Over the year (June 2018 to June 2019), the Kansas labor force is down by 1,186 (0.1 percent) using seasonally adjusted data, with declines of 0.1 percent and 0.2 percent over the last two months. Non-seasonal data shows a decline of 7,793 (0.5 percent) in the labor force over the year.

The number of unemployed persons fell from May 2019 to June 2019 by 1,585, or 3.1 percent. The unemployment rate was 3.4 percent in June, up from 3.3 percent from one year ago, and down from 3.5 percent in May.

Using seasonal data, Kansas nonfarm jobs increased by 0.78 percent over the past 12 months, while national jobs grew by 1.54 percent.

Of the loss of 900 jobs from May to June, 600 were gained in the private sector, while 1,500 were lost in government.

Goods-producing jobs rose by 1,200, while service-providing jobs fell by 2,100.

Construction jobs grew by 1,100, and 1,600 jobs were lost in trade, transportation, and utilities.

Click charts and tables for larger versions.

In the following chart of showing job changes from the same month one year ago, Kansas is always below the national rate.

In the following chart showing job changes from the previous month, Kansas sometimes outperforms the nation.

Kansas personal income

For the first quarter of 2019, the rate of personal income growth in Kansas was less than the national rate, although better than the Plains states.

Today the Bureau of Economic Analysis, an agency of the United States Department of Commerce, released state personal income data for the first quarter of 2019. The news release is here.

For Kansas, personal income in 2019 Q1 was $148,991 million, an increase of 3.0 percent from the previous quarter. (These values, while considering one quarter, are expressed as an annual rate, and are adjusted for seasonality.) For the nation, the increase was 3.4 percent. For Plains states, the increase was 2.1 percent. (For this data, Plains States are Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota.)

The increase in Kansas was thirty-sixth best among the states.

For the first quarter of 2019, earnings in Kansas grew by $602 million. Farm earnings fell by $104 million.

According to BEA, “Personal income is the income received by, or on behalf of, all persons from all sources: from participation as laborers in production, from owning a home or business, from the ownership of financial assets, and from government and business in the form of transfers. It includes income from domestic sources as well as the rest of world. It does not include realized or unrealized capital gains or losses.”

Also from BEA: “Earnings by place of work is the sum of wages and salaries, supplements to wages and salaries, and proprietors’ income. BEA’s industry estimates are presented on an earnings by place of work basis.”

Click for larger image and the news release..

Kansas jobs, May 2019

Employment in Kansas grew in May 2019, but continued a trend of slower growth than the nation. The labor force is smaller.

Data released yesterday from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, part of the United States Department of Labor, shows rising employment in Kansas for May 2019. (Click charts and tables for larger versions.)

Using seasonally adjusted data, from April 2019 to May 2019, nonfarm employment in Kansas rose by 600, which is 0.04 percent. Over the year, the number of Kansas nonfarm jobs for May 2019 rose by 12,900 or 0.9 percent over last May. This is using seasonally adjusted data. The non-adjusted figure is higher at 16,500, or 1.2 percent.

Over the year (May 2018 to May 2019), the Kansas labor force is up by 0.1 percent using seasonally adjusted data, with declines of 0.2 percent and 0.1 percent over the last two months. Non-seasonal data shows a decline of 1,574 (0.1 percent) in the labor force over the year.

The number of unemployed persons fell from April 2019 to May 2019 by 222, or 0.4 percent. The unemployment rate was 3.5 percent in May, up from 3.3 percent from one year ago, and unchanged from April.

Using seasonal data, Kansas jobs increased by 0.91 percent over the past 12 months, while national jobs grew by 1.58 percent.

Of the growth of 600 jobs from April to May, 100 were in the private sector, and 500 in government.

Goods-producing jobs fell by 1,100, while service-providing jobs rose by 1,700.

Construction jobs fell by 1,600, and 1,300 jobs were gained in trade, transportation, and utilities.

Click charts and tables for larger versions.

In the following chart of showing job changes from the same month one year ago, Kansas is always below the national rate.

In the following chart showing job changes from the previous month, Kansas sometimes outperforms the nation.

Kansas jobs, April 2019

Employment in Kansas continues to grow in April 2019, but continues a trend of slower growth than the nation. The labor force is smaller.

Data released today from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, part of the United States Department of Labor, shows rising employment in Kansas for April 2019.

Click for larger

Using seasonally adjusted data, from March 2019 to April 2019, nonfarm employment in Kansas rose by 6,900, which is 0.5 percent. Over the year, the number of Kansas nonfarm jobs for April 2019 rose by 12,400 or 0.9 percent over last April. This is using seasonally adjusted data. The non-adjusted figure is nearly identical at 12,300.

Over the year (April 2018 to April 2019), the Kansas labor force is up by 0.3 percent using seasonally adjusted data, with declines of 0.1 percent and 0.2 percent over the last two months. Non-seasonal data shows a decline of 7,033 (0.5 percent) in the labor force over the year.

The number of unemployed persons fell from March 2019 to April 2019 by 331, or 0.6 percent. The unemployment rate was 3.5 percent in April, up from 3.4 percent from one year ago, and unchanged from March.

Looking at annual job growth on a monthly basis shows Kansas averaging 0.94 percent over the past 12 months, while the rate for the nation is 1.75 percent.

Click charts and tables for larger versions.

Kansas personal income growing, but slowly

For 2017, just four states had less growth in personal income than Kansas.

Statistics released today by the Bureau of Economic Analysis, an agency of the United States Department of Commerce, show personal income in Kansas growing at a slow rate.

The figures released today are through calendar year 2017. For that year, personal income in Kansas grew to $141,459 million, up 2.4 percent from $138,105 million the previous year. These are current dollars.

Using inflation-adjusted dollars, income growth was 0.8 percent.

Of the states, BEA noted: “Two states had declines in real personal income — North Dakota (-1.3 percent) and South Dakota (-0.4 percent). States with the slowest growth in real personal income were Iowa (0.3 percent), New Mexico (0.6 percent), and Kansas (0.8 percent).”

The per capita personal income figures for Kansas rose by the same percentage values as the current and inflation-adjusted income. In current dollars, per capita personal income in Kansas for 2017 was $48,600.

BEA offers these definitions:

Personal income is the income received by, or on behalf of, all persons from all sources: from participation as laborers in production, from owning a home or business, from the ownership of financial assets, and from government and business in the form of transfers. It includes income from domestic sources as well as the rest of world. It does not include realized or unrealized capital gains or losses.

Personal income is measured before the deduction of personal income taxes and other personal taxes and is reported in current dollars (no adjustment is made for price changes). Comparisons for different regions and time periods reflect changes in both the price and quantity components of regional personal income.

The estimate of personal income for the United States is the sum of the state estimates and the estimate for the District of Columbia; it differs slightly from the estimate of personal income in the national income and product accounts (NIPAs) because of differences in coverage, in the methodologies used to prepare the estimates, and in the timing of the availability of source data.

Per capita personal income is calculated as the total personal income of the residents of a given area divided by the population of the area. In computing per capita personal income, BEA uses Census Bureau mid-year population estimates.

Kansas GDP

In the fourth quarter of 2018, the Kansas economy grew at the annual rate of 0.9 percent, down from 1.2 percent the previous quarter.

In the fourth quarter of 2018, the Kansas economy grew at the annual rate of 0.9 percent in real (inflation-adjusted) dollars, according to statistics released today by Bureau of Economic Analysis, a division of the United States Department of Commerce. GDP for the quarter was at the annual rate of $169,558 million.

The rate of 0.9 percent ranked forty-fifth among the states.

Quarterly GDP growth for states can be volatile, as shown in the nearby chart.

Over the last eight quarters, Kansas has averaged quarterly growth rates of 0.5 percent in annual terms. For the nation, the rate was 2.7 percent. For the Plains states, it was 1.5 percent. (For this data, BEA defines Plains states as Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota.)

For Kansas, industries that differed markedly from the nation include agriculture, utilities, construction, nondurable goods manufacturing, educational services, and government and government enterprises.

Updated: Employment in the States

An interactive visualization of the civilian labor force, employment, and unemployment, for each state. Updated through March 2019.

As seen in the nearby example, Kansas continues its undistinguished record in job growth as compared to nearby states. In the visualization, you can easily choose states to compare, select a timeframe, and look at labor force, employment, and unemployment.

Click here to learn more about the data and access the interactive visualization.

Click for larger.

Kansas jobs, March 2019

Employment in Kansas continues to mostly grow in March 2019, but continues a trend of slower growth than the nation.

Data released last week from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, part of the United States Department of Labor, shows a decline in jobs in Kansas for February 2019.

Click for larger.

Using seasonally adjusted data, from February 2019 to March 2019, nonfarm employment in Kansas fell by 2,500, which is 0.2 percent. Over the year, the number of Kansas nonfarm jobs for March 2019 rose by 5,900 or 0.4 percent over last March. This is using seasonally adjusted data. The non-adjusted figure is nearly the same at 5,300.

Over the year (March 2018 to March 2019), the Kansas labor force is up by 0.5 percent using seasonally adjusted data, with only small changes over the past three months. Non-seasonal data shows a slight decline in the labor force over the year.

The number of unemployed persons rose from February 2019 to March 2019, rising by 792 persons, or 1.5 percent. The unemployment rate was 3.5 percent in March, up from 3.4 percent from one year ago, and also up from 3.4 percent in February.

Click charts and tables for larger versions.

The following chart shows the change in nonfarm jobs over the same month one year ago. For the past several years the line for Kansas has been below the line for the nation, meaning jobs were growing slower in Kansas. Recently, however, the gap between the lines is smaller.

Kansas personal income

For 2018, the rate of personal income growth in Kansas was near the bottom of the states, although the fourth quarter was much better.

Today the Bureau of Economic Analysis, an agency of the United States Department of Commerce, released state personal income data for the fourth quarter of 2018, as well as preliminary state personal income for 2018.

For Kansas, personal income in 2018 was $146,028 million, an increase of 3.2 percent from 2017. For the nation, the increase was 4.5 percent. For Plains states, the increase was 3.9 percent. (For this data, Plains States are Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota.)

The increase in Kansas was forty-sixth best among the states.

Per capita personal income in Kansas was $50,155 in 2018, compared to $50,905 for Plains states and $53,712 for the nation.

Earnings in Kansas grew by $3,159 million in 2018, although farm earnings fell by $659 million.

For the fourth quarter of 2018, Kansas personal income grew at the annual rate of 5.7 percent, which was sixteenth-best among the states.

According to BEA, “Personal income is the income received by, or on behalf of, all persons from all sources: from participation as laborers in production, from owning a home or business, from the ownership of financial assets, and from government and business in the form of transfers. It includes income from domestic sources as well as the rest of world. It does not include realized or unrealized capital gains or losses.”

Also from BEA: “Earnings by place of work is the sum of wages and salaries, supplements to wages and salaries, and proprietors’ income. BEA’s industry estimates are presented on an earnings by place of work basis.”

State personal income change, 2017 to 2018. Click for larger.

Updated: Kansas hotel guest tax collections

Kansas hotel guest tax collections presented in an interactive visualization.

Updated with data through January 2019.

Cities and counties in Kansas may levy a transient guest tax collection on hotel guests. It is sometimes called a bed tax or guest tax. The tax is collected as a percentage of total room revenue, not the number of rooms or the rate charged for rooms. While the Kansas Department of Revenue collects the tax, the proceeds are returned to the cities or counties, except for a two percent processing fee. In Wichita the rate is six percent.

Of note, while Wichita is the largest city in Kansas, Overland Park collects the most hotel guest tax. Of the largest markets in Kansas, Wichita is usually one of the lowest-growth cities.

Click here to access the visualization.

Example from the visualization. Click for larger.


Notes

Kansas jobs, February 2019

Employment in Kansas shows a seasonal decline for February 2019.

Data released this week from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, part of the United States Department of Labor, shows a decline in jobs in Kansas for February 2019.

Using seasonally adjusted data, from January 2019 to February 2019, nonfarm employment in Kansas fell by 2,200, which is 0.2 percent. Over the year, the number of Kansas nonfarm jobs for February 2019 rose by 8,800 or 0.6 percent over last February. This is using seasonally adjusted data. The non-adjusted figure is nearly the same at 7,600.

Over the year (February 2018 to February 2019), the Kansas labor force is up by 0.4 percent, with only small changes over the past three months.

The number of unemployed persons rose from January 2019 to February 2019, rising by 301 persons, or 0.0 percent. The unemployment rate was 3.4 percent in February, down from 3.5 percent from one year ago, and the same as January.

Click charts and tables for larger versions.

The following chart shows the change in nonfarm jobs over the same month one year ago. For the past several years the line for Kansas has been below the line for the nation, meaning jobs were growing slower in Kansas. Recently, however, the gap between the lines is smaller.

Kansas jobs, January 2019

Employment in Kansas continues to grow, but slower than the nation.

Data released today from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, part of the United States Department of Labor, shows a mostly improving jobs picture for Kansas in January 2019.

Over the year (January 2018 to January 2019), the Kansas labor force is up by 0.7 percent, also rising slightly over the past three months.

The number of unemployed persons rose from December 2018 to January 2019, rising by 931 persons, or 1.9 percent. The unemployment rate was 3.4 percent in January, down from 3.5 percent from one year ago, but up by 0.1 percentage points from December. This is because the labor force grew by a larger proportion than did workers.

Click charts and tables for larger versions.

The number of Kansas nonfarm jobs for January 2019 rose by 14,300 or 1.0 percent over last January. This is using seasonally adjusted data. The non-adjusted figure is nearly the same at 14,000.

From December 2018 to January 2019, nonfarm employment in Kansas grew by 500, which is 0.04 percent.

Using seasonal data, nonfarm employment in Kansas grew by 0.85 percent from January 2018 to January 2019. Over the same period, job growth in the nation was 1.68 percent.

Kansas GDP

In the third quarter of 2018, the Kansas economy grew at the annual rate of 2.3 percent, down from 4.7 percent the previous quarter.

In the third quarter of 2018, the Kansas economy grew at the annual rate of 2.3 percent in real (inflation-adjusted) dollars, according to statistics released today by Bureau of Economic Analysis, a division of the United States Department of Commerce. GDP for the quarter was at the annual rate of $165,415 million.

Kansas real GDP growth through 2018-Q3. Click for larger.
The rate of 2.3 percent ranked thirty-eighth among the states. In the second quarter of 2018, Kansas GDP was seventh-best in the country.

Quarterly GDP growth for states can be volatile, as shown in the nearby chart.

For Kansas, industries that differed markedly from the nation include agriculture, durable goods manufacturing, real estate and rental and leasing, and government and government enterprises.

Kansas jobs, December 2018

Data released today from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, part of the United States Department of Labor, shows a mostly improving jobs picture for Kansas in December 2018.

Over the year (December 2017 to December 2018), the Kansas labor force is up by 0.8 percent, also rising slightly over the past three months.

The number of unemployed persons rose from November to December, rising by 686 persons, or 1.4 percent. The unemployment rate was 3.3 percent in December, down from 3.5 percent from one year ago, but up by 0.1 percentage points from November. This is because the labor force grew by a larger proportion than did workers.

Click charts and tables for larger versions.

The number of Kansas nonfarm jobs for December 2018 rose by 20,100 or 1.4 percent over last December. This is using seasonally adjusted data. The non-adjusted figure is nearly the same at 19,900.

From November 2018 to December 2018, nonfarm employment in Kansas grew by 1,100, which is 0.1 percent.

Lawrence (Kansas) Park in Winter. By brent flanders. https://flic.kr/p/7wxm4o.
Click for larger.

From Pachyderm: Martin Hawver

From the Wichita Pachyderm Club: Martin Hawver, dean of the Kansas Statehouse press corps. This was recorded January 4, 2019.

Martin Hawver is the editor and publisher of Hawver’s Capitol Report, the respected, non-partisan news service that reports on Kansas government and politics.

He also is the dean of the Kansas Statehouse press corps, having covered the beat (36 years) longer than any current Statehouse reporter — first for 17 years as a Statehouse reporter for the Topeka Capital-Journal and since 1993 for Hawver’s Capitol Report. He is the primary reporter/writer for the news service. He also writes a column syndicated to Kansas newspapers, is interviewed about Kansas government and politics on TV and radio shows, and is a speaker for seminars and conventions.

Hawver has covered 36 Kansas legislative sessions and 14 national Republican and Democratic political conventions, plus countless statewide and local political conventions.

Hawver writes a weekly column called “At The Rail” that is syndicated to Kansas newspapers. He also turns out to be an entertaining, informative, and pretty well-known public speaker, and if your Kansas-based group is interested in political humor, government humor, or even just understanding the landscape in the ever-more-confusing world of politics, you might want to consider having Martin Hawver speak. (Source: Hawver’s Capitol Report)

Kansas agency expenditures

Data regarding State of Kansas agency spending presented in an interactive visualization.

The source of this data is KanView, the Kansas transparency portal, through its download center. Data from multiple years are combined into one database. Data starts with fiscal year 2011.

This visualization is experimental. I would appreciate feedback on views of this data that would be useful.

Click here to access the visualization.

Example from the visualization. Click for larger.