Tag Archives: Economics

Kansas jobs, July 2019

Employment rose and the labor force in Kansas fell slightly in July 2019 compared to the two previous months, and employment continued a trend of lower growth than the nation over the year.

Data released today from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, part of the United States Department of Labor, shows a mixed picture for employment in Kansas for July 2019. (Click charts and tables for larger versions.)

Using seasonally adjusted data, from June 2019 to July 2019, nonfarm employment in Kansas rose by 2,500, which is 0.2 percent. Over the year, the number of Kansas nonfarm jobs for July 2019 rose by 14,200 or 1.0 percent over last July. This is using seasonally adjusted data. The non-adjusted figure is higher at 18,300, or 1.3 percent.

Over the year (July 2018 to July 2019), the Kansas labor force is down by 2,870 (0.2 percent) using seasonally adjusted data, with declines of 0.2 percent and 0.0 percent over the last two months. Non-seasonal data shows a decline of 1,589 (0.1 percent) in the labor force over the year.

The number of unemployed persons fell from June 2019 to July 2019 by 915, or 1.8 percent. The unemployment rate was 3.3 percent in July, unchanged from one year ago, and down from 3.4 percent in June.

Using seasonal data, Kansas nonfarm jobs increased by 1.00 percent over the past 12 months, while national jobs grew by 1.51 percent.

The gain of 2,500 jobs from June to July consisted 3,700 of gains in the private sector and 1,200 lost in government.

Goods-producing jobs rose by 600, and service-providing jobs grew by 1,900.

Construction jobs grew by 200, manufacturing grew by 400, and 800 jobs were gained in trade, transportation, and utilities.

Click charts and tables for larger versions.

In the following chart of showing job changes from the same month one year ago, Kansas is always below the national rate.

In the following chart showing job changes from the previous month, Kansas sometimes outperforms the nation.

Kansas spending rising

Kansas spending is rising, and will probably rise at a faster pace.

Figures from Kansas financial reports show that state spending has risen, and based on approved budget, will rise at a faster pace.

The following tables and charts show actual data through fiscal year 2018. Data for fiscal years 2019 and 2020 are based on figures approved by the legislature and governor, plus estimates regarding the future economy.

In the following table, spending increases from the general fund average 7.3 percent per year for 2010 through 2020. There is a budget surplus, primarily due to changes in tax law that produced a 15.0 percent increase in receipts to the general fund in 2018.

Based on currently-approved figures, the general fund will swing from surplus to deficit in 2020.

Click charts for larger versions.

Following charts show increases in spending for the general fund and all funds spending (see below for an explanation of the funds). These charts are adjusted for inflation where appropriate, and show spending per resident, along with spending as a portion of private sector production and personal income.

The Governor’s Budget Report for 2020 explains:

The State General Fund receives the most attention in the budget because it is the largest source of the uncommitted revenue available to the state. It is also the fund to which most general tax receipts are credited. The Legislature may spend State General Fund dollars for any governmental purpose.

Special revenue funds, by contrast, are dedicated to a specific purpose. For instance, the Legislature may not spend monies from the State Highway Fund to build new prisons.

Other examples of special revenue funds are the three state building funds, which are used predominantly for capital improvements; federal funds made available for specific purposes; and agency fee funds, which can generally be used only to support specific functions related to the agency collecting the fee. The Economic Development Initiatives Fund, the Children’s Initiatives Fund, the Kansas Endowment for Youth Fund, the Expanded Lottery Act Revenues Fund, and the State Water Plan Fund are appropriated funds that function the same as the State General Fund.

The principal that “may not spend monies from the State Highway Fund to build new prisons” is often violated in practice, and example being the well-known transfers from the highway fund to the general fund.

Campaigning on Wichita as recession-proof

The City of Wichita and Mayor Jeff Longwell shouldn’t be using flimsy evidence that is contrary to actual economic data.

Earlier this year Wichita city officials promoted an article that praised the Wichita economy. 1 A tweet came from the official @CityofWichita Twitter account and reads “We have been named one of the top two recession-proof cities in the nation by @Livability. Wichita was praised for its ability to withstand turbulence in the national economy, steady job growth and the state’s low income-to-debt ratio.” 2

Now Wichita Mayor Jeff Longwell is using this in his campaign to be reelected mayor.

The problem is that this claim of Wichita being recession-proof isn’t true. I explain in more detail in Wichita, a recession-proof city.

Here are two charts of actual economic data. The first chart shows the change in real gross domestic product for the Wichita metropolitan statistical area and the nation.

Click for larger.

Notice that since the Great Recession ended in 2009, there have been three separate years in which Wichita GDP declined. Since a recession is defined as a period of declining GDP, Wichita is obviously not recession-proof.

As for the “ability to withstand turbulence in the national economy,” these three years of shrinking Wichita GDP were years when the national economy expanded.

As for “steady job growth,” here is a chart of annual job growth for the Wichita metropolitan statistical area and the nation.

Click for larger.

Since the end of the Great Recession, there have been two years in which Wichita lost jobs while the nation was gaining jobs. This happened most recently in 2017, while Longwell was mayor. Since the end of the Great Recession, Wichita has created jobs at a much slower pace than the nation. Wichita has been doing better last year and this year, although recent months have shown a loss of jobs. 3


Notes

  1. Handy, Emily. The 7 Most Recession-Proof Cities in the US. Livability. January 22, 2019. Available at https://livability.com/topics/careers-opportunities/the-7-most-recession-proof-cities-in-the-us.
  2. Twitter, January 22, 2019. https://twitter.com/CityofWichita/status/1087832893274157059.
  3. Weeks, Bob. Wichita jobs and employment, June 2019. https://wichitaliberty.org/economics/wichita-jobs-and-employment-2019-06/.

Wichita jobs and employment, June 2019

For the Wichita metropolitan area in June 2019, the labor force is up, the number of unemployed persons is up, the unemployment rate is down, and the number of people working is up when compared to the same month one year ago. Seasonal data shows declines in labor force and jobs from May.

Data released today by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, part of the United States Department of Labor, shows a slowing employment situation for the Wichita Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Click charts and tables for larger versions.

Total nonfarm employment rose from 297,300 last June to 302,600 this June. That’s an increase of 5,300 jobs, or 1.8 percent. (This data is not seasonally adjusted, so month-to-month comparisons are not valid.) For the same period, employment in the nation grew by 1.5 percent. The unemployment rate in June 2019 was 3.6 percent, down from 4.1 percent one year ago.

Considering seasonally adjusted data from the household survey, the labor force fell by 317 persons (0.1 percent) in June 2019 from May 2019, the number of unemployed persons fell by 269 (2.3 percent), and the unemployment rate was down to 3.6 percent from 3.7 percent in May. The number of employed persons not working on farms fell to 299,144 in June from 299,192 the prior month, a decline of 47 persons, or 0.0 percent.

The following chart of the monthly change in labor force and employment shows a general decline over the past year, then three consecutive months of losses for both measures.

The following chart of changes from the same month one year ago shows six consecutive months of decline in the rate of growth of both employment and labor force. The values are growing, but at a slower pace each month since January.

Kansas GDP

In the first quarter of 2019, the Kansas economy grew at the annual rate of 3.1 percent, up from 0.9 percent the previous quarter.

In the first quarter of 2019, the Kansas economy grew at the annual rate of 3.1 percent in real (inflation-adjusted) dollars, according to statistics released today by Bureau of Economic Analysis, a division of the United States Department of Commerce. GDP for the quarter was at the annual rate of $171,215 million.

Click for larger.

The rate of 3.1 percent ranked twentieth among the states and matched the rate for the entire nation.

Quarterly GDP growth for states can be volatile, as shown in the chart.

Over the last eight quarters, Kansas has averaged quarterly growth rates of 1.3 percent in annual terms. For the nation, the rate was 2.9 percent. For the Plains states, it was 2.0 percent. (For this data, BEA defines Plains states as Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota.)

For Kansas, industries that performed substantially better than the nation include agriculture, durable goods manufacturing, durable goods manufacturing, retail trade, and management of companies and enterprises.

Click for larger.

Kansas jobs, June 2019

Employment and the labor force in Kansas fell slightly in June 2019, and continued a trend of mostly slower growth than the nation over the year.

Data released today from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, part of the United States Department of Labor, shows falling employment in Kansas for June 2019. (Click charts and tables for larger versions.)

Using seasonally adjusted data, from May 2019 to June 2019, nonfarm employment in Kansas fell by 900, which is 0.1 percent. Over the year, the number of Kansas nonfarm jobs for June 2019 rose by 11,000 or 0.8 percent over last June. This is using seasonally adjusted data. The non-adjusted figure is higher at 16,900, or 1.2 percent.

Over the year (June 2018 to June 2019), the Kansas labor force is down by 1,186 (0.1 percent) using seasonally adjusted data, with declines of 0.1 percent and 0.2 percent over the last two months. Non-seasonal data shows a decline of 7,793 (0.5 percent) in the labor force over the year.

The number of unemployed persons fell from May 2019 to June 2019 by 1,585, or 3.1 percent. The unemployment rate was 3.4 percent in June, up from 3.3 percent from one year ago, and down from 3.5 percent in May.

Using seasonal data, Kansas nonfarm jobs increased by 0.78 percent over the past 12 months, while national jobs grew by 1.54 percent.

Of the loss of 900 jobs from May to June, 600 were gained in the private sector, while 1,500 were lost in government.

Goods-producing jobs rose by 1,200, while service-providing jobs fell by 2,100.

Construction jobs grew by 1,100, and 1,600 jobs were lost in trade, transportation, and utilities.

Click charts and tables for larger versions.

In the following chart of showing job changes from the same month one year ago, Kansas is always below the national rate.

In the following chart showing job changes from the previous month, Kansas sometimes outperforms the nation.

Metropolitan employment and labor force

A visualization of employment, labor force, and unemployment rate for metropolitan areas, now with data through May 2019.

How does the Wichita metropolitan area compare with others regarding employment, labor force, and unemployment rate? A nearby example shows data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, part of the United States Department of Labor. Considering growth of employment since the start of the decade, the answer is Wichita has not performed well.

This illustration came from an interactive visualization I created from BLS data. Click here to learn more and use the visualization.

Click for larger.

Updated: National transit database

An interactive visualization of data over time from the National Transit Database. Now with data through 2017.

Do you wonder how much it costs to run your transit system? The National Transit Database holds data for transit systems in the U.S. I’ve gathered some key statistics and presented them in an interactive visualization.

In the case of Wichita, we see that “OpExp per PMT” for 2017 was $1.44. This is total operating expense per passenger mile traveled. It’s not the cost to move a bus a mile down the street. It’s the cost to move one passenger one mile. And, it is operating cost only, which means the costs of the buses are not included.

Some definitions used in the database:

  • UZA: The name of the urbanized area served primarily by a transit agency.
  • UPT: Unlinked passenger trips. “The number of passengers who board public transportation vehicles. Passengers are counted each time they board a vehicle no matter how many vehicles they use to travel from their origin to their destination.”
  • PMT: Passenger miles traveled.
  • Total OpExp: Total operating expense.

Click here learn more about the data and to access the visualization.

Click for larger.

Updated: Economic indicators in the states

After a trend of decline, coincident and leading economic indicators for Kansas are improving.

The Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia calculates two indexes that track and forecast economic activity in the states and the country as a whole. Values are available through May 2019.

The coincident index is a measure of current and past economic activity for each state. The leading index predicts the six-month growth rate of the state’s coincident index. Positive values mean the coincident index is expected to rise in the future six months, while negative values mean it is expected to fall. (For more detail, see Visualization: Economic indicators in the states.)

For Kansas, the coincident index has been on a mostly downhill trend since May 2018. But for April and May of this year, the index has risen.

The leading index shows the same trend: A peak one year ago, then mostly down except rising for the last two months.

A nearby chart shows index values for the last two years for Kansas, some nearby states, and the United States. You can access the visualization and create your own charts here: Visualization: Economic indicators in the states.

Click chart for larger.

Wichita jobs and employment, May 2019

For the Wichita metropolitan area in May 2019, the labor force is up, the number of unemployed persons is up, the unemployment rate is unchanged, and the number of people working is up when compared to the same month one year ago. Seasonal data shows declines in labor force and jobs from April.

Data released today by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, part of the United States Department of Labor, shows a slowing employment situation for the Wichita Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Click charts and tables for larger versions.

Total nonfarm employment rose from 300,000 last May to 303,200 this May. That’s an increase of 3,200 jobs, or 1.1 percent. (This data is not seasonally adjusted, so month-to-month comparisons are not valid.) For the same period, employment in the nation grew by 1.5 percent. The unemployment rate in May 2019 was 3.5 percent, same as one year ago.

Considering seasonally adjusted data from the household survey, the labor force fell by 402 persons (0.1 percent) in May 2019 from April 2019, the number of unemployed persons fell by 57 (0.5 percent), and the unemployment rate was unchanged at 3.7 percent. The number of employed persons not working on farms fell to 299,023 in May from 299,368 the prior month, a decline of 345 persons, or 0.1 percent.

The following chart of the monthly change in labor force and employment shows a general decline over the past year, then two consecutive months of losses for both measures.

The following chart of changes from the same month one year ago shows six consecutive months of decline in the rate of growth of both employment and labor force. The values are growing, but at a slower pace each month.

Kansas personal income

For the first quarter of 2019, the rate of personal income growth in Kansas was less than the national rate, although better than the Plains states.

Today the Bureau of Economic Analysis, an agency of the United States Department of Commerce, released state personal income data for the first quarter of 2019. The news release is here.

For Kansas, personal income in 2019 Q1 was $148,991 million, an increase of 3.0 percent from the previous quarter. (These values, while considering one quarter, are expressed as an annual rate, and are adjusted for seasonality.) For the nation, the increase was 3.4 percent. For Plains states, the increase was 2.1 percent. (For this data, Plains States are Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota.)

The increase in Kansas was thirty-sixth best among the states.

For the first quarter of 2019, earnings in Kansas grew by $602 million. Farm earnings fell by $104 million.

According to BEA, “Personal income is the income received by, or on behalf of, all persons from all sources: from participation as laborers in production, from owning a home or business, from the ownership of financial assets, and from government and business in the form of transfers. It includes income from domestic sources as well as the rest of world. It does not include realized or unrealized capital gains or losses.”

Also from BEA: “Earnings by place of work is the sum of wages and salaries, supplements to wages and salaries, and proprietors’ income. BEA’s industry estimates are presented on an earnings by place of work basis.”

Click for larger image and the news release..

Kansas jobs, May 2019

Employment in Kansas grew in May 2019, but continued a trend of slower growth than the nation. The labor force is smaller.

Data released yesterday from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, part of the United States Department of Labor, shows rising employment in Kansas for May 2019. (Click charts and tables for larger versions.)

Using seasonally adjusted data, from April 2019 to May 2019, nonfarm employment in Kansas rose by 600, which is 0.04 percent. Over the year, the number of Kansas nonfarm jobs for May 2019 rose by 12,900 or 0.9 percent over last May. This is using seasonally adjusted data. The non-adjusted figure is higher at 16,500, or 1.2 percent.

Over the year (May 2018 to May 2019), the Kansas labor force is up by 0.1 percent using seasonally adjusted data, with declines of 0.2 percent and 0.1 percent over the last two months. Non-seasonal data shows a decline of 1,574 (0.1 percent) in the labor force over the year.

The number of unemployed persons fell from April 2019 to May 2019 by 222, or 0.4 percent. The unemployment rate was 3.5 percent in May, up from 3.3 percent from one year ago, and unchanged from April.

Using seasonal data, Kansas jobs increased by 0.91 percent over the past 12 months, while national jobs grew by 1.58 percent.

Of the growth of 600 jobs from April to May, 100 were in the private sector, and 500 in government.

Goods-producing jobs fell by 1,100, while service-providing jobs rose by 1,700.

Construction jobs fell by 1,600, and 1,300 jobs were gained in trade, transportation, and utilities.

Click charts and tables for larger versions.

In the following chart of showing job changes from the same month one year ago, Kansas is always below the national rate.

In the following chart showing job changes from the previous month, Kansas sometimes outperforms the nation.

Airport traffic statistics, 2018

Airport traffic data presented in an interactive visualization, updated through 2018.

This visualization holds data from TranStats, a service of the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), which is the independent statistical agency within the United States Department of Transportation (DOT). While monthly data is available, this visualization holds annual totals.

The nearby example shows data starting in 2010 for the nation (blue lines) and Wichita. The visualization holds data for all U.S. airports with scheduled flights.

Example from the visualization, showing Wichita compared to all airports, through 2018. Click for larger

A few observations regarding Wichita airport traffic as compared to the nation:

  • Since 2014, passenger traffic (departing passengers) at the Wichita airport is higher, but traffic for the nation as a whole is much higher.
  • The number of scheduled departures has been declining in Wichita, while increasing for the nation after a decline.
  • The number of available seats on departing flights from Wichita has been mostly level, while rising sharply for the nation.
  • Load factor for Wichita has been rising, while level and declining slightly for the nation.

To view and use the interactive visualization, click here.

New metropolitan rankings regarding knowledge-based industries and entrepreneurship

New research provides insight into the Wichita metropolitan area economy and dynamism.

The Walton Family Foundation has released a study titled “The Most Dynamic Metropolitans,” saying it is new research ranking the economic performance of metropolitan areas in the Heartland and across the country. 1

Of the study, the authors write “Our Most Dynamic Metropolitan Index, and the analysis contained in this report provides objective insight into the communities providing economic opportunity for their residents, separating high performers from the low. Most Dynamic Metropolitans provides fact-based metrics on near-term and medium-term performance and prospects for long-term growth. The index allows economic development officials the ability to monitor their metro’s vivacity relative to others on a national basis or within their region and state.”

In the overall rankings, Wichita was number 319 of 379 metropolitan areas examined. Of note, this research recognizes the importance of young firms:

While most of our metrics are commonly used indicators of economic development, the young firm employment ratio is a relatively new measure. We use factor analysis to test our hypothesis that the ratio is an indicator of longer-term economic growth. Factor analysis is a statistical tool that can derive categories, called factors, from several variables by finding the ways clusters of variables move together. A factor analysis on all of our metrics tells us that we generally have the two factors we claimed to have above: one closely relating to variables such as 2016-2017 growth in average annual pay and 2017-2018 job growth. The second most closely relating to per-capita personal income, 2013-2017 growth in real GDP, 2013-2017 average annual pay growth and the young firm employment ratio. Thus, our hypothesis regarding the young firm employment ratio seems valid.

There have been some rankings showing Wichita doing well in jobs at young firms. 2 That’s good, as young firms — which are different from small business — are vitally important to economic growth. 3

This study, however, shows Wichita lagging in young firm employment ratio. In these rankings, Wichita came in at position 247 of 379 metro areas. That is better than the overall ranking for Wichita, which is at number 319.

The young firm employment ratio is calculated using data from 2016. Perhaps newer data will show something different.


Notes

  1. Walton Family Foundation. New Metropolitan Rankings Show Knowledge-Based Industries and Entrepreneurship Drive Success. June 10, 2019. Press release with links to documents available at https://www.waltonfamilyfoundation.org/about-us/newsroom/new-metropolitan-rankings-show-knowledge-based-industries-and-entrepreneurship-drive-success.
  2. Weeks, Bob. Metro Monitor evaluates the Wichita economy. Available at https://wichitaliberty.org/economics/metro-monitor-evaluates-wichita-economy-2018/.
  3. Jason Wiens and Chris Jackson. The Importance of Young Firms for Economic Growth. Available at https://www.kauffman.org/what-we-do/resources/entrepreneurship-policy-digest/the-importance-of-young-firms-for-economic-growth.

Updated: Metropolitan populations

A visualization of the population of metropolitan statistical areas, now with annual data from 1969 through 2018.

For most types of economic and demographic analysis, metropolitan statistical areas (MSA) are preferred to cities proper. The Census Bureau notes: “The general concept of a metropolitan or micropolitan statistical area is that of a core area containing a substantial population nucleus, together with adjacent communities having a high degree of economic and social integration with that core.” 1

Wichita officials usually recognize this and have started to emphasize the importance of the region (the MSA), not just the city. Many of our civic agencies have named or renamed themselves like these examples: Greater Wichita Partnership, Wichita Regional Chamber of Commerce, Blueprint for Regional Economic Growth, Metropolitan Area Planning Commission, Wichita Area Planning Organization, Regional Economic Area Partnership of South Central Kansas, South Central Kansas Economic Development District.

Further, there is more economic data available at the MSA level (compared to the city level) from agencies like Bureau of Labor Statistics and Bureau of Economic Analysis. This data includes important measures like employment, labor force, unemployment rate, gross domestic product, and personal income.

This visualization has several different views of population data, from tables to charts showing relative growth. A new feature is a map. You can select a range of years, and as you point to a metropolitan area you’ll see the population change over that time.

to access the visualization.

Example from the visualization. Click for larger.


Notes

Wichita airport traffic

Traffic is rising at the Wichita airport. How does it compare to others?

Click for larger.
Passenger traffic at Wichita Dwight D. Eisenhower National Airport has been rising. We know that from news reports and social media. While rising activity is good, it’s important to place Wichita in context with other airports.

(The Wichita airport has reported data through April 2019, while comprehensive national data from the Bureau of Transportation Statistics is available through February, so these comparisons are through February.)

Media reporting on the Wichita airport often uses “passengers” as the measure. The industry, however, uses “enplanements” as the most important measure of airport traffic. When Bureau of Transportation Statistics uses the term passengers, the precise meaning of the data is enplanements. 1

Looking at passengers (that is, enplanements) for the Wichita airport, we see that monthly Wichita passenger counts are rising, generally. 2 But not for all months. Over the past year, there were three months when traffic fell, compared to the same month of the previous year.

Compared to the nation, there were seven months in the past year when the increase in passengers in Wichita was greater than the change for all airports, as shown in the bars for each month in the nearby chart. Because of several slow months in Wichita coupled with some the of good months in Wichita being only slightly better than the nation, the overall picture is not as good for Wichita. This can be seen by the lines in the same chart, where the change in passengers over the last year is always higher for the nation.

Besides the number of passengers, we should also consider the number of flights departing an airport. This is particularly important to business travelers, as for them, the availability of a flight today or tomorrow may be more important than a bargain-price fare. In this chart, there are some months where the number of flights fell from the year before. The 12-month trend for Wichita is falling while rising for the nation.

Is the reported rising passenger count at the Wichita airport good news? Of course it is. But a useful assessment requires placing the Wichita data in context. In that context, the Wichita airport is underperforming.

Click charts for larger versions.

In the following chart of passengers, Wichita counts are generally rising, but not as fast as the nation. This data is indexed with January 2011 representing 100. The thicker lines are the average of the prior 12 months in order the smooth the seasonality of the monthly data.

In the following chart of the number of flights, Wichita is on a downward trend generally, although in the last two years the value has increased slightly.


Notes

  1. The government requires carriers to report enplanements, so it is a consistent measure across all airports. Further, airports generate revenue primarily from enplaned passengers rather than arriving passengers. The number of enplanements is almost exactly half the number of passengers. Over the last 15 years, enplanements in Wichita have accounted for 49.88 percent of passengers, with deplanements being 50.12 percent.
  2. Passenger traffic data is highly seasonal. It is not uncommon for passenger counts in the summer months to be 25 or 30 percent higher than winter counts. Therefore, comparisons are to the same month in the previous year.

Updated: Populations of the states

An interactive table and charts of populations in the states and regions, from 1929 through 2018.

How have the states grown in population since 1929? Growth varies widely. This visualization has several views that illustrate changes in state populations.

Click here to access this visualization.

Source of data is Bureau of Economic Analysis, an agency of the United States Department of Commerce.

Click for larger.

Populations of the states

An interactive table and charts of populations in the states and regions, starting in 1929.

How have the states grown in population since 1929? Growth varies greatly.

In the accompanying visualization, one chart of the growth of population uses a logarithmic scale. This better shows a wide range of values. On this scale, negative values can’t be shown. The example below highlights Kansas against the other states.

Another tab in this visualization displays a map of the states along with a slider to select a range of years. For each state, you can see the change in population over this range of time.

Click here to access this visualization.

Source of data is Bureau of Economic Analysis, an agency of the United States Department of Commerce.

Population growth in the states, Kansas highlighted, using logarithmic scale. Click for larger.
Population growth in the states, Kansas highlighted, using logarithmic scale. Click for larger.
Click for larger.

Updated: State government tax collections

Kansas personal income tax collections rose by $372 per person in 2018, an increase of 46.5 percent.

Each year the United States Census Bureau collects a summary of taxes collected by each state for 5 broad tax categories and up to 25 tax subcategories. 1 I’ve collected this data and made it available in an interactive visualization. Data is through 2018.

You may recall that Kansas raised personal income tax rates in 2017 and made the new rate retroactive to January 1, 2017. But that change doesn’t seem to have affected the data for fiscal year 2017. For 2016, Kansas collected $767 per person in individual income taxes, and for 2017, $800. Not much difference.

Now data for fiscal year 2018 is available, and it shows Kansas collecting $1,172 per person in individual income taxes, an increase of $372 or 46.5 percent over 2017.

(Here’s the reason for the 2017 data being relatively unaffected. For most states, including Kansas, this data is for the fiscal year, not the calendar year. 2 New withholding tax tables were not available until June 27, 2017, just three days before the end of fiscal year 2017. 3)

Considering all taxes, Kansas collected $3,279 per person in 2018, up from $2,808 in 2017, an increase of $471 or 16.8 percent.

Click here to access the visualization.

Click images for larger versions.

In the following chart showing total tax collections per person over time, Kansas now collects more than our surrounding states.

This chart shows for 2018, the total and the composition of taxes collected.


Notes

  1. United States Census Bureau. Annual Survey of State Government Tax Collections (STC). Available at https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/stc.html.
  2. United States Census Bureau. State Government Tax Collections: 2017 Technical Documentation. Available at https://www2.census.gov/programs-surveys/stc/technical-documentation/complete-technical-documentation/statetaxtechdoc2017.pdf.
  3. Kansas Department of Revenue. New Kansas income tax withholding tables now available. Available at https://www.ksrevenue.org/CMS/content/06-27-2017-NewWHTables.pdf.