Regulation

Could drug price regulation produce good and not harm?

Could drug price regulation produce good and not harm?

A sampling of criticism of drug price controls. Trump’s Drug Price Control Orders Are Bound to Backfire At a White House gathering last Friday, President Trump announced four new executive orders intended to restrict the ways pharmaceutical companies set the price of prescription drugs. He signed and issued three that day and promised to issue a fourth if drug industry representatives don’t agree to massive price controls at a meeting tomorrow. Seemingly oblivious to the fact that just eight days earlier he staged a highly publicized press conference to explain how regulation often does more harm than good and portray…
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Net neutrality, regulation, and the internet

Dr. Theodore Bolema is founding director of the Institute for the Study of Economic Growth at Wichita State University and member of the Department of Economics at Wichita State University. On November 8, 2019 he spoke at the Wichita Pachyderm Club on the topics of net neutrality and regulation of the internet. View below, or click here to view at YouTube. Video production by Paul Soutar.
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Regulation in Wichita, a ‘labyrinth of city processes’

Regulation in Wichita, a ‘labyrinth of city processes’

Wichita offers special regulatory treatment for special circumstances, widening the gulf between the haves and have-nots. The Wichita Eagle reports that part of what the City of Wichita is offering to Cargill as an inducement to stay in Wichita is regulatory relief.[1. Rengers, Carrie. City offers Cargill tax abatement, parking garage financing. Wichita Eagle, June 6, 2016. Available at www.kansas.com/news/business/article82076122.html.] In particular: The city has offered smaller incentives to Cargill as well, including an ombudsman. [Wichita assistant city manager and director of development Scot] Rigby called the ombudsman something of a project manager. “They’ll just call one person,” Rigby said…
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Federal rules serve as ‘worms’ buried in promises of ‘free money’

Federal rules serve as ‘worms’ buried in promises of ‘free money’

An often unappreciated mechanism throughout the Kansas budget severely limits the ability of legislators and governors to adapt to changing state priorities. A new paper from Kansas Policy Institute explains. Federal Rules Serve as "Worms" Buried in Promises of "Free Money" Mandates remove state control of budgets, exemplify increasing federal overreach July 30, 2015 -- Wichita -- An often unappreciated mechanism throughout the Kansas budget severely limits the ability of legislators and governors to adapt to changing state priorities. These Maintenance of Effort (MOE) requirements are highlighted in a new paper by Kansas Policy Institute and is authored by former…
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Westar: First, control blatant waste

Westar: First, control blatant waste

As our electric utility asks for a rate increase, let's first ask that it stop blatant waste. Westar, our state-regulated electric utility, is asking for a rate increase. As part of any increase, we ought to insist that the utility do a better job of controlling blatant waste. Streetlights burning unnecessarily in the middle day in downtown Wichita is an ongoing problem. See In Wichita, wasting electricity a chronic problem and Waste in Wichita, the seen and probably unseen for examples. The problem may not be solved soon. No one has much motivation to solve the problem. The city pays…
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Rebuilding liberty without permission

A forthcoming book by Charles Murray holds an intriguing idea as to how Americans can reassert liberty: Civil disobedience. Make the federal government an "insurable hazard." I think it's a great idea. For an easy introduction to this concept, listen to the Cato Institute's seven-minute podcast of Murray speaking about these ideas. From the publisher: American freedom is being gutted. Whether we are trying to run a business, practice a vocation, raise our families, cooperate with our neighbors, or follow our religious beliefs, we run afoul of the government—not because we are doing anything wrong but because the government has…
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Study on state and local regulation released

Study on state and local regulation released

This week Kansas Policy Institute released a study of regulation and its impact at the state and local level. This is different from most investigations of regulation, as most focus on federal regulations. The study is titled "Business Perceptions of the Economic Impact of State and Local Government Regulation." It was conducted by the Hugo Wall School of Public Affairs at Wichita State University. Click here to view the entire document. Following is an excerpt from the introduction by James Franko, Vice President and Policy Director at Kansas Policy Institute. Surprising to some, the businesses interviewed did not have as…
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Food labeling act to be heard

Food labeling act to be heard

A bill sponsored by U.S. Representative Mike Pompeo of Wichita will be heard in committee this week. On his Facebook page, Pompeo wrote: On December 10 there will be a hearing in the Energy and Commerce Committee to review the Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act. We will hear testimony from expert scientists and those with a wide variety of experiences. We will also hear from those who produce the safest food in the world here in America. This legislation will make the following reforms: Ensure that new innovations in food are -- and always remain -- safe by creating…
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Cato Institute: A discussion of net neutrality

From Cato Institute, a discussion of net neutrality. The debate continues over whether "net neutrality" is the equivalent of old-school utility regulation of telecommunication firms. The President and others are now asking the FCC to treat telecom firms in the same ways telephone companies were treated decades ago. Berin Szoka, president of TechFreedom, comments. View below, or click here to view at YouTube.
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For GMOs, a patchwork of state regulations would be a nightmare

For GMOs, a patchwork of state regulations would be a nightmare

A complicated regulatory landscape for genetically modified foods would shift power to large food producers at the expense of small companies and innovative startups. Have you ever seen a product that displayed a label that states: "This product contains a chemical known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm." And notifying you that you should wash your hands after handling it? In my case, it was a cable attached to a computer peripheral. How is that that the State of California "knows" this product is harmful, but none of the other states…
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‘Ten Thousand Commandments’ for 2014 released

Ten Thousand Commandments 2014 By Clyde Wayne Crews Full Report Available Here Ten Thousand Commandments is the Competitive Enterprise Institute’s annual survey of the federal regulatory state. Authored by CEI Vice President for Policy Clyde Wayne Crews, it shines a light on the large, growing, and hidden costs of America’s regulatory state. The scope of federal government spending and deficits is sobering, but federal regulations cost hundreds of billions – perhaps trillions – of dollars annually. Unfortunately, they get little attention in policy debates. Regulatory costs are difficult to quantify because, unlike taxes, they are unbudgeted and often indirect. Ten Thousand Commandments…
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Kansas advanced biofuels plant subject of New York Times story

The New York Times has provided a story on the future of advanced biofuels, using a plant under construction in Kansas as the centerpiece. The plant, near the western Kansas town of Hugoton, produces cellulosic ethanol. Instead of using kernels of corn as input, the plant uses material like corn stalks and wheat straw. When the Hugoton plant starts operations in May, it will be twice as large as the largest plant currently in operation. A few notes: The lede of the story: "There is an old joke in the energy business that advanced biofuels are the fuel of the…
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Gosnell movie smashes through crowdfunding record

Gosnell movie smashes through crowdfunding record

Following is a message from Ann & Phelim Media on the continuing success of the crowdfunding campaign for the Gosnell Movie. I've made a contribution, and I hope you do too, as the goal is not yet met. The movie on Philadelphia abortion doctor Kermit Gosnell has just become the most successful film ever on the Indiegogo crowdfunding website. Gosnell, a made for TV project on the doctor who is America's most prolific serial killer, has just smashed through the $900,000 mark -- overtaking the previous record holder which had raised $898,000. Gosnell was convicted of the murder of several…
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Regulation failure leads to tragedy in Wichita

Regulation failure leads to tragedy in Wichita

When the Wichita City Council passed new taxicab regulations in 2012, the focus was on dirty cabs and slovenly drivers who were not acting as goodwill ambassadors for the city. Mayor Carl Brewer said he was "tired" of hearing complaints about drivers. So the council passed new regulations regarding taxicabs, including the requirement that drivers attend customer service training provided by Go Wichita Convention and Visitors Bureau. Other regulations determine taxicab office staffing levels and level of supervision. But something very important slipped through the cracks. The Wichita Eagle has reported the city didn't competently enforce regulations designed to protect…
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Exchange data security breaches don’t require notification

The breach of consumer data at Target has brought the issue of data security in focus. Yesterday a senator called for more protection and accountability for consumers and retailers. The following story from Watchdog.org tells us that government does not want to hold itself to the standards it wants the private sector to observe. There has been legislation proposed. Rep. Diane Black [R-TN6] has introduced H.R. 3731: Federal Exchange Data Breach Notification Act of 2013, whose title is "To require an Exchange established under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act to notify individuals in the case that personal information…
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USA versus You: The problem of overcriminalization

Events in recent months have justifiably caused Americans to ask whether a powerful, activist, and interventionist government and bureaucracy is good to have. Those who have been looking at overcriminalization, however, have known that government and regulatory agencies have been targeting and oppressing Americans for a long time. And it's getting worse. The new website USAvsYOU.com holds useful information for Americans to know about how law has changed in recent years, compared to how it operated for centuries before. The booklet available for reading is titled USA vs. You: The flood of criminal laws threatening your liberty. As an example,…
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We could use the shutdown as a teachable moment

The United States government is in the third day of a partial shutdown. It’s quite a coincidence that Chapter 9 of Henry Hazlitt's book "Economics in One Lesson" talks about government employees right at the time we’re in a government shutdown. Here, Amanda BillyRock illustrates this chapter of "Economics in One Lesson." (Click here to view at YouTube.) You know how on a day when it has snowed or there’s been an ice storm, you hear on the news that “only essential government employees should report to work today.” When I hear that, I've wondered “Why do we have non-essential…
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Regulations, even well-intentioned, may be dangerous

A regulation intended to save children resulted in many more deaths. The reason is the lulling effect. Do well-intentioned regulations ever produce the opposite effect? In 1972 the Food and Drug Administration introduced regulations requiring child-resistant bottlecaps for aspirin and some other medications. The goal was to reduce aspirin poisonings among children. Surely this is a laudable goal. If government has the capability to reduce these tragedies, why wouldn't we implement laws or regulations? When W. Kip Viscusi looked at data, he found something striking and very sad: After the implementation of the regulations, there was no significant impact on…
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USA vs. You: The problem of overcriminalization

Events in recent months have justifiably caused Americans to ask whether a powerful, activist, and interventionist government and bureaucracy is good to have. Those who have been looking at overcriminalization, however, have known that government and regulatory agencies have been targeting and oppressing Americans for a long time. And it's getting worse. The new website USAvsYOU.com holds useful information for Americans to know about how law has changed in recent years, compared to how it operated for centuries before. The booklet available for reading is titled USA vs. You: The flood of criminal laws threatening your liberty. As an example,…
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REAP: We’ll plan for you, like it or not

Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want, and deserve to get it good and hard. -- H.L. Mencken We've learned that the government planners will plan for you, whether or not you want it. Despite having voted against participation, two Kansas counties are still included in a regional planning consortium. The new website thinktomorrowtoday.org promotes and supports the sustainable communities government planning process in South-Central Kansas. The planning effort has been rebranded as "South Central Kansas Prosperity." In the logo, on a map, and in narrative, Butler and Sumner counties are listed as participants. But…
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