Kansas Governor Sam Brownback on wind energy

Recently Kansas Governor Sam Brownback wrote an editorial praising the benefits of wind power. (Gov. Sam Brownback: Wind offers clean path to growth, September 11, 2011 Wichita Eagle) Brownback has also been supportive of another form of renewable energy, ethanol.

But not everyone agrees with the governor’s rosy assessment of wind power. Paul Chesser of American Tradition Institute offers a rebuttal of Brownback’s article, which first appeared in a Bloomberg publication.

Chesser writes: “Apparently Gov. Brownback has overlooked the horrid results of efforts in recent years to spur the economy and employment with government renewable energy ‘stimulation’ from taxpayer dollars. … The lessons of failure with government mandates in pursuit of a renewable energy economy are not hard to find.”

Chesser goes on to describe ATI’s study which illustrates the negative economic consequences of renewsable energy standards, which Brownback has supported. The study is The Effects of Federal Renewable Portfolio Standard Legislation on the U.S. Economy.

Following is Chesser’s response to Governor Brownback.

Kansas Gov., Former Sen. Brownback Incorrect on Promise, Economics of Renewable Energy

By Paul Chesser

American Tradition Institute today called attention to the many fallacies in a column written by Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback and published yesterday in the Bloomberg Government newsletter (subscription required), in which the former U.S. Senator touted the “long-term benefits” and “job creation” ability of renewable energy, predominantly with wind power.

Apparently Gov. Brownback has overlooked the horrid results of efforts in recent years to spur the economy and employment with government renewable energy “stimulation” from taxpayer dollars. He wrote for Bloomberg, “Experience has taught us that investments in the renewable energy economy is creating jobs across all employment sectors, including construction, engineering, operations, technology and professional services, in both rural and urban communities.”

“Unlike most of his fellow Republicans, it sounds like the governor continues to support President Obama’s failed initiatives to create ‘Green jobs’ in a hopeless attempt to save the U.S. economy,” said Paul Chesser, executive director of American Tradition Institute.

Continue reading at ATI Release: Kansas Gov., Former Sen. Brownback Incorrect on Promise, Economics of Renewable Energy.


3 thoughts on “Kansas Governor Sam Brownback on wind energy”

  1. I have a close relative who works for an electricity producer that knows all the ins and outs of energy production ,costs, and all related expenses. His company is required, by law, to produce 1/4 of their electricity by wind energy,, and he says that it costs 4 times as much to produce wind electricity vs. coal electricity. They keep extremely good records of everthing….

  2. Renewable energy argument is only for corporations to make money. If these tax incentives (advise appraisser’s office), grants not loans to individuals instead of wasted corporations.
    then let us bring in the appropriate people. wind energy isn’t the only form of renewable energy. It is not cost effective in this State for an individual to go with solar collectors when the appraiser’s office will swoop down on you and jack your taxes everytime you improve your property. Kansas property taxes are trampling any effort to make your homes more effecient. I have a modular home, these idiots call it a mobile home. It has no tounge, has no wheels, is securely anchored to concrete slabs under the house that are tied into the foundation that the home sets on. My taxes are higher now than they were 3 years ago when I put this home in and mobile homes are supposed to ‘depreciate’…………….
    this stupid state squashes any improvement what soever.

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